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Title Public Response to China’s Economic Inducements: Evidence from the Philippines
Post date 06/07/2018
C1 Background and Explanation of Rationale

Economic statecraft – the use of economic tools to pursue political goals – has been an important part of China’s foreign policy. However, both large-N analyses and case studies have produced conflicting conclusions on whether economic statecraft is effective. China has often used economic inducements in an effort to influence the policies of target countries, but this has had varying degrees of success. What characteristics of economic statecraft strategies allow or impede political effectiveness? Specifically, what kind of effects do economic inducements have on public opinion in the target country?

C2 What are the hypotheses to be tested?

(H1a) Inducements that subvert established political processes and institutions worsen public attitudes toward China.
(H1b) Inducements that subvert established political processes and institutions reduce public support for cooperative foreign policy toward China.
(H2ba) Inducements that adhere to established political processes and institutions improve public attitudes toward China.
(H2b) Inducements that adhere to established political processes and institutions increase public support for cooperative foreign policy toward China.

C3 How will these hypotheses be tested? *

The sample of N=900 will be drawn using a Qualtrics online panel. Qualtrics panel providers email respondents with a link to take the survey. Aside from age restrictions (over 18), consent to participate, Filipino citizenship, and a gender quota, no other eligibility based on demographic factors is considered. The survey has a total of 3 treatment populations. T0, the control population, receives a neutral, factual description of China’s investment projects in the Philippines. T1 receives a subversive prime in addition to the control vignette, discussing how China’s inducements undermine established political processes and institutions in the Philippines. T2 receives a stakeholder prime in addition to the control vignette, discussing how China’s inducements adhere to established political processes and institutions in the Philippines.

C4 Country Philippines
C5 Scale (# of Units) 900
C6 Was a power analysis conducted prior to data collection? No
C7 Has this research received Insitutional Review Board (IRB) or ethics committee approval? Yes
C8 IRB Number 0000008281
C9 Date of IRB Approval 06/01/2017
C10 Will the intervention be implemented by the researcher or a third party? Researchers
C11 Did any of the research team receive remuneration from the implementing agency for taking part in this research? No
C12 If relevant, is there an advance agreement with the implementation group that all results can be published? not provided by authors
C13 JEL Classification(s) not provided by authors